10 comments on “TSM Episode 382: The Fartbutt MegaBup”

  1. Great podcast this week! Good to see Bup, as always, I dig his sense of humor.

    One subject that came up during the podcast, was when you all were talking with Adeki about what final fantasy’s were essential to play. Now, I grew up during the NES/SNES era. When I heard that FF9 and FF7 were the go to games, I for the most part concurred, but I felt like I would be betraying my past by not mentioning the older SNES era final fantasy RPGs. Then I thought “wait for a second…”– how much am I attributing nostalgia and the “rose tinted glasses” concept to my old favorite?.

    Probably the biggest final fantasy game of my youth was FF6. It brought more a life to the table narrative wise, than the previous final fantasy games. It was incredibly immersive, and for the time, had a great intricate character building system. However, though I have loyally stood by the game, it doesn’t quite stand the test of time as perhaps FF7 and FF9 have, with just the ability of the ps1 had as a system to create a better story visually, as well as deeper and more applicable game mechanics. Though my experience with FF6 may have been more rich, because it set the standard for my young grade school mind, I feel like Square really perfected what they were trying to do with the PlayStation era games. It seemed like to me, though now it seems like a lot of people feel like the ps1 era had a deformed/cartoonish visually displeasing style, that square reached the apex of what they were trying to do with the jrpg style. Now, it’s like they are trying to soup up the narrative/cinematic aspect, while disengaging from the people who loved the game mechanics Square originated with during the Nintendo era.

    I suppose I was just wondering, if anyone else was been able to compartmentalize the games they love from their youth, with the whole concept of “looking back with rose colored glasses”? Any old favorites by anyone not quite stand the test of time?

  2. @Fu: I suppose I was just wondering, if anyone else was been able to compartmentalize the games they love from their youth, with the whole concept of “looking back with rose colored glasses”? Any old favorites by anyone not quite stand the test of time?

    Of course, and this is why I did not suggest that FF4/6 are the definitive FF experience in term of the setting/feel/world/game style. I love FF4 and FF6, and have played them to bits since they were originally released; just as I played FF1 over and over again when it came out. But I recognise that these games don’t quite sum up the whole FF series feel in the same way that FF9 does, which was the point that I was making.

    Personally I think people should play through the series in order, the better to see its development as it took place, and to better appreciate the changes that were taken and the improvements that were made. However, I also know how unlikely that is an exepectation because of the cost and (more importantly) the time required. And this is without considering, for example, how unlikely a modern gamer is to sit down and play through the original NES release of Final Fantasy, let alone the fan-translated versions of FF2 and FF3. These are things that I enjoy because I can still get to the mental place where they are impressive and wonderful. The vast majority of younger gamers have never experienced that and can neither understand it nor mentally recreate it.

    @Fu: Now, it’s like they are trying to soup up the narrative/cinematic aspect, while disengaging from the people who loved the game mechanics Square originated

    As much as it feels like this is the present turn, it has been going on for a long time. It began in the PS1 era, in fact. Square began to get a reputation for stunning CGI cutscenes. This led them to conceive of themselves as CGI movie directors rather than video game makers. In fact, if you look at the back of your Parasite Eve box, you’ll see that it top bills itself as “THE CINEMATIC RPG”. And of course they were busily working away on The Spirits Within as well, convinced that they were going to make the leap from video games to movies.

    The failure may have doomed Square Honolulu, but it did not really effect a change in their way of thinking about the role that cinematics plays in their company. Had it done, they would be in a better place now.

  3. Best show since the new year’s program with Sabin as the guest (the one that spawned the Bon Jovi, Halfway There running gag). You guys are at your best when you’re just goofing around like this.

    Also, kudos to Bup for remembering the Azores from Fate of Atlantis. I know them from an episode of Anthony Bourdain (who was also mentioned on this show). Incidentally, this ep also doubled as a better Indiana Jones podcast than the one I listen to at the Raider.net.

    Thanks for the fun listen guys.

  4. Bup is the Bach of Lusipurr.com.

    You thought the podcast would get Baroque? No. It was suite. It was No. 1.

    #BWV1007

  5. If Bup would show up more frequently, you could have a bit more of this. So go yell at him on Twitter or something.

  6. @Lusipurr I went back to play the original Final Fantasy on the NES after playing FF4/FF6. While it was a fun game and worth my time, it was as you stated, interesting to see where they came from as far as ironing out the kinks. I remember specifically having to plot out when I thought each enemy would die, because the party members would still attack the empty space after an enemy would die. It said something like “Ineffective”, which makes me chuckle looking back. That and saving at an inn, with them giving you the urgent warning “Hold reset when you turn the power off!!!” which for whatever reason, I read that voice with an Arnold Swarzeneggar accent. I’m eagerly awaiting I am Setsuna, so I can feed into my jrpg nostalgia.

  7. @Fu: The old “attack dead enemies/ineffective” thing persisted for a while, and I seem to recall that it was in FF2 on the NES. By the time FF3 was released, I think it was deprecated. It has been more than a year since I last played through FF3 NES, so I may be misremembering.

    Old NES games constantly freaked out about holding in the reset button whilst the power was turned off. The idea was to prevent any voltage surge in the battery caused by pressing the power button in such a way that it would cause the console to turn on and off very rapidly (i.e. with shaky fingers or a several-button-push. The reset button functioned as a power interruptor, so that if it were held in, it effectively suspended the console–thus allowing any amount of power button use without the console being affected.

    Nintendo translated this terror across consoles and hardware, as anyone who remembers Mr. Resetti from Animal Crossing can confirm.

  8. It was also pretty hilarious that in FF1, beyond buying a tent, you could buy a cabin, and also a house. “Hey guys! Man, I’m beat, wanna build a house real quick?”

  9. A memorable episode, to say the least.

    So quotable:

    “Those who live in glass stones shouldn’t throw houses.”

    “Make sure to break out those fedoras, boys, cuz the ladies are waiting.”

    “I have scientific evidence that George Lucas is a fucking terrible writer.”

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