TSM Episode 519: Et in Arcade ego

...but not beautifully ported.

Beautifully created!

Download Link: Released 2019.02.04

In the wake of yet another disastrous performance by the England Cricket team, Lusipurr eschews conversation about sport, retreating instead to the traditional bastion of all those who are disinclined to physical activity: the video game arcade.

28 comments on “TSM Episode 519: Et in Arcade ego”

  1. I can say Romancing SaGa 3 even though I haven’t played it yet since I know it will be a favorite righr?

  2. My first instinct says Super Metroid which DOES say “Metroid III” on the intro title screen, or Persona 3. Also remember Dragon Warrior III, Mega Man 3, Super Mario Bros 3, Samurai Shodown III, Street Fighter Alpha 3, and Street Fighter 3: Third Strike

  3. I think the best threequel is the SNES version of Final Fantasy III.

  4. Nope, it has III in the title, and it was the third mainline FF released in the West. I know that SE tried to retcon it into being the sixth game, but I’m going to honour their original intentions! ^_^

  5. Mine would have to be Yakuza 3. It was my entry point for the series and the reason I bought every subsequent release.

  6. @SN: Noooooooope. Disallowed!

    And, you are *all* wrong: the best ‘threequel’ is Castlevania III!



  7. Adventures of Lolo 3
    Arc the Lad III
    Battlefield III
    Breath of Fire III
    Call of Duty 3
    Castlevania III
    Class of Heroes 3
    Columns III
    Command and Conquer 3
    Command and Conquer Red Alert 3
    Commander Keen 3
    Dance Dance Revolution 3
    Dark Souls III
    Diablo III
    Disgaea 3
    Donkey Kong 3
    Donkey Kong Country 3
    Double Dragon 3
    DragonQuest III
    Dynasty Warriors 3
    Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
    Etrian Odyssey 3
    Fallout 3
    Farcry 3
    Final Fantasy III
    Front Mission 3
    Gauntlet III: The Final Quest
    God of War III
    Golden Axe III
    Gradius III
    Grandia 3
    Grand Theft Auto III
    Gran Turismo 3
    .hack Part 3: Outbreak
    Halo 3
    King’s Quest III
    Leisure Suit Larry 3
    Mechwarrior 3
    Mega Man 3
    Mega Man X 3
    Mega Man Battle Network 3 Blue/White
    Mega Man Zero 3
    Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater
    Metroid III
    Mortal Kombat 3
    Phantasy Star III
    Police Quest III
    R-Type III
    Resident Evil 3: Nemesis
    Romance of the Three Kingdoms III
    Romancing SaGa III
    SaGa III
    Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne 3
    Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 3
    Silent Hill 3
    Sonic the Hedgehog 3
    Soul Calibur 3
    Space Quest III
    Street Fighter 3
    Suikoden III
    Super Mario Bros. 3
    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III
    Tekken 3
    Ultima III: Exodus
    Valkyria Chronicles 3
    Virtua Fighter 3
    Warcraft III
    Wario Land 3
    Wild Arms 3
    Wizards and Warriors 3
    Wonder Boy III: Monster Lair
    Xenosaga Episode III
    Yakuza 3
    Ys III

  8. @Lusipurr: Is that a list of suggestions? Also, there is no Lufia 3.

  9. Does .Hack Outbreak count? I was under the impression that it was the third part of a single game.

  10. While it’s not among my favorite IIIs, Golden Axe III is the best Golden Axe. I loved the title of the episode, by the way.

  11. When the third part of Final Fantasy VII Remake is finally released, will that count?

  12. @Tanzenmatt: I’m glad! I explained the reference to Imitanis and SiliconNooB, but they don’t understand Latin, and were probably too drunk to follow my explanation anyway.

  13. I was definitely happy with the discussion on arcades. It did jump out to me that the Golden Age would have been the mid-70’s to mid-80’s. I was born the same year as S’Noob, and I was 8 when I would start hanging out at my local arcade in a mall by myself for a couple hours. ’92 – that was when Street Fighter II: Championship Edition came out. It seemed like it was all rapidly expanding from that point until the late 90s (that arcade closed after Marvel vs Capcom came out, I think), but if you were around when arcades dwindled in the later 80s then you would know that the 90s were actually a Silver Age.

    Besides my local mall, there were a few entertainment centers, kart racing/mini golf/laser tag sorts of places, that had arcades – one was detached on its own. There were really a lot of options for going to the arcade in my area in the mid-90s. One of those kept on until about 2010; feeling nostalgic, I went there in later days and played Marvel vs Capcom 2 and Rival Schools. Then all of a sudden they ditched the arcade games, it was like a knife-turn when I needed that activity the most.

    The activity, going to some neutral place full of different game options, is what I miss the most. Yes, you can play everything at home now, but when all of your interests leave you inside your home all of the time, it can be depressing to some. Maybe not to others. Like I wrote in a comment some months ago, there is a place about an hour to hour-and-a-half away that is exactly what I remember from that smaller mall arcade in the mid-90s, but it’s a really special occasion to go that far.

    The first arcade game, maybe first video game, I ever played was a cocktail table of Ms. Pac-Man at a steak restaurant. It was being out in the world, yet being in another world at the same time. For some reason, going somewhere to sit down and play Switch or 3DS doesn’t hit the same nerve as playing a cabinet in an arcade, or even in the game room of a hotel. There was something special about that time and place in the Silver Age of Arcades which I wish would come back, at least in some form.

  14. @Lusipurr: If you do decide to play an Ys game on stream, one to consider would be Ys Origin. It has a top down view, and a more classic aesthetic and feel that you seem to be looking for. You may very well get that out of the first Ys game, I have never played it and honestly wouldn’t know what to expect. So perhaps that is the one that I should support that you play after all so I can watch it and find out!

    I will also join the chorus of support for Ys 8 as well. The strongest pitch that I can think to make towards you specifically is that it has a character recruitment system not unlike that of the Suikoden series. As you explore the island, you encounter other characters who then join your base, and these characters are the ones that end up running your shops, forging new weapons for you, managing a garden, things like that.

    I loved the arcade discussion! Just hearing the name “Rampage” put a huge smile on my face, that was another one of my favorites and I hadn’t thought of that in long time. I never played all the way across the country in the arcade, but I did a few times on the NES. As much as I loved playing arcade games, I always welcomed NES ports of them so that I could play them as much as I pleased without bugging my mom for what probably felt like an endless stream of quarters. :) I am definitely going to do a deep dive on the list of arcade games presented. Most of them I have played, others I am now curious about!

    The image of Imitanis (or anybody) dual wielding light guns or anything of the sort is a fantastic one! Rambitanis?

  15. Most of my favorite “3” games have been mentioned above already, but here are mine nonetheless:

    Mega Man 3
    Metal Gear Solid 3
    Super Mario Bros. 3
    Disgaea 3
    Final Fantasy 3 (SNES)
    Persona 3
    Fatal Frame 3
    Xenosaga 3
    Romance of the 3 Kingdoms 3
    Dark Souls 3
    Suikoden 3
    3D Dot Game Heroes (does that count?)

    Last but certainly not least, Dragon Warrior 3. This was the first RPG that I ever played, so it isn’t an exaggeration to say that walking out of the video rental store with that game for the first time was a turning point in my life!

  16. Okay, now that I have a few minutes to myself…!
    Some *really* properly excellent comments today. These will make the podcast. Keep the arcade memories coming!

    @TanzenMatt writes: For some reason, going somewhere to sit down and play Switch or 3DS doesn’t hit the same nerve as playing a cabinet in an arcade, or even in the game room of a hotel. There was something special about that time and place in the Silver Age of Arcades which I wish would come back, at least in some form.

    One of the things that had started to vanish during (and maybe had mostly vanished by) the silver age was the fact that the majority of gamers weren’t necessarily teenagers and kids. During the golden age, it was not unusual for a large number of the players, perhaps even a majority of them, to be adults. In some of the pictures in my links above you can get this sense. Twenty-to-Forty-somethings in their ties and blazers just off work or on their lunch break would be there, popping quarters into machines to play games that by today’s standards are appallingly antiquated (Lunar Lander springs to mind).

    Not only were arcades cross-generational, they were often cross-cultural and ungendered. There were fewer girls in arcades, yes, but not because of any direct stigma or pressure. Video games were not particularly marketted towards girls, so there was less interest. But, I say again, there were girls there, and women! By the late ’70s, arcades were one of the few popular American engagements in which absolutely anyone could do without any social stress, regardless of social standing, race, sex, or age.

    That began to change at some point in the ’80s and by the ’90s the arcades had few adult gamers in them at all. I think part of this had to do with the availability of consoles: adults could afford to simply buy a console outright, whereas most children and adolescents had to rely upon parents to make that purchase for them. Growing up, many of my friends’ parents played video games on the NES, although by the time the SNES came out they had mostly stopped. Perhaps the interest had just waned, or perhaps there were generational pressures that I don’t quite understand. In any case, I never saw an adult pick up an PS1 controller, or express an interest in an RPG even after, say, 1992 (I did know adults who played RPGs on the NES).

    So although there are good monetary reasons for turning from Arcades, at the same time their disappearance leaves people without a place to experience the ‘future of gaming’, or to play things for themselves before buying them (a situation which digital demos could address if they were actually common instead of rare). But worst of all is the loss of the social location: a place to be defined by a shared cultural engagement, video games. The internet took over that unifying location in the mid-’90s, but by the mid-2000s it was toast too. So, really, for the first time since the mid 1970s, gamers no longer have a cultural niche, be it location or medium, to call ‘their own’.

  17. Moving on! @DefChaos writes: I loved the arcade discussion! Just hearing the name “Rampage” put a huge smile on my face, that was another one of my favorites and I hadn’t thought of that in long time. I never played all the way across the country in the arcade, but I did a few times on the NES. As much as I loved playing arcade games, I always welcomed NES ports of them so that I could play them as much as I pleased without bugging my mom for what probably felt like an endless stream of quarters.

    Rampage is such a classic arcade game, and having it on the NES was just about the only way really to experience it in its totality. My next-door-neighbour and I used to play it in her family’s den, sitting on bean bags. Between that, Sonic the Hedgehog, Ecco the Dolphin, and Final Fantasy on the NES, we spent thousands of hours in front of the TV. When she died last May, one of the first things I thought about was all the time we spent playing Sonic and Rampage together.

    NES ports of Arcade games may have contributed to the decline of arcades to a degree, but at the same time they made it possible for lots of people to be able to experience video games outside of the range of arcades. They were much more numerous back then, but they weren’t exactly on every street corner, like a Starbucks or a Taco Bell today. My sense is that most cities of some reasonable size (say 5,000 people+) had one in some form, and larger cities would have several, competing with one another to have the newest and best games. In fact, it is towards just those sort of owner-operators that arcade fliers are directed, often pointing out the latest technological innovations in the hardware, the different settings that the owner can use to draw people into playing the game, and (almost always) a breakdown of expected revenue based on play testing.

    Although Atari games probably took a tiny bite out of the arcade share, the reality is that Atari games (even on the 7800) were not particularly faithful in their presentation of contemporary or even only near-contemporary titles. A good example of this is something like Pac-Man. It was ported extensively, including to the Atari 2600 and the NES. The Atari 2600 version captures something of the experience: there is a pac man. He eats dots. There are ghosts. There are super pellets which render the ghosts vulnerable to being eaten. But in respect of presentation and faithful replication of the controls, it’s vastly inferior to the original. By the time the NES version of Pac-Man came out, what is presented on the screen is much closer to the arcade version. It’s still slightly lower in quality, but that diminishment is harder to notice unless you are viewing them fairly close together (in time or space).

    There are Atari 2600 and 7800 versions of Rampage too. They’re about what you would expect. But the NES version is pretty close to the general experience of the Arcade, if one doesn’t look too closely, and isn’t too picky. And, in the 1980s, people generally didn’t look too closely.

    Still, I find myself wishing that the arcade still existed and still carried with it a cultural capital. I don’t know if I would ever make use of it–I’m reluctant to leave the house already, and I hardly play the games I have on the television here. If I had to make use of an arcade to play video games, I’d probably not play them at all. And yet it is hard to set aside that practical reality because the arcade somehow still retains great power as a nostalgic device. One day, when virtuality becomes possible, or rapid transport is simply a fact of ordinary existence, I predict the arcade will rise again, and people will join their friends from around the globe for a game of Fortnite XII or even a game or two at the ‘classic’ counter, playing Tempest and Gauntlet.

  18. Not only were arcades cross-generational, they were often cross-cultural and ungendered.
    That’s such a big part of what I missed too! Since a lot of these places were in malls, or adjacent to where people would gather otherwise, it was great just to stop and play a game for a few minutes to an hour. It wasn’t just for the capital G-gamer, or even a casual fan, but also for someone who wouldn’t otherwise care if they didn’t have time to burn. Ultimately, I think the $.25 was a huge part of the demise in the later 90s, as it must have become unprofitable for the arcade owners, and one-by-one went out of business.

    I would recommend Ys Book I & II for a first Ys game, as I think it exemplifies the feel of the series. My first was Ys III: Wanderers From Ys on SNES, but I came back to the series after almost 2 decades when Book I & II was released on DS. It’s available on Steam/GOG too.

  19. I never played Rampage, but I really enjoyed King of the Monsters, which had a similar premise.

  20. Another week of BRILLIANT comments! We’re spoiled for choice on the next podcast.

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